RU-486 Mifepristone & Misoprostol (200 mg)

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What is RU486?

RU 486 is a chemical compound that, taken in pill form, can induce abortion in women up to nine weeks pregnant. This compound gets the first part of its name from the French company, Roussel Uclaf, which first developed the abortion pill back in 1980. The "486" designation is the shortened version of the original "38486" compound number the pill was first assigned in the Roussel Uclaf laboratory.

 

RU486 is also known by its generic name, mifepristone, and by Mifegyne, the name under which RU486 is marketed in Europe. "Mifeprex," is the name under which it is to be sold in the United States though it will also be marketed as the "Early Option" pill.

 

How does RU486 work?

RU486 is an artificial steroid that interferes with the action of progesterone, a hormone crucial to the early progress of pregnancy. Progesterone stimulates the proliferation of the uterine lining which nourishes the developing child. It also suppresses normal uterine contractions which could dislodge the child implanted and growing on the wall of the mother's womb.

 

RU486 fills the chemical receptor sites normally reserved for progesterone, but does not transmit the progesterone signal. Failing to receive that signal, a woman's body shuts down the preparation of the uterus and initiates the normal menstrual process. The child, deprived of necessary nutrients, starves to death. The baby detaches and is swept out of the body along with the decayed uterine lining.

 

Is this the "morning after" pill I've heard so much about?

 No. Those pills operate in a different way and during a different time frame than RU486.

 

Morning after pills, or "emergency contraception," are essentially very high, multiple dosages of birth control pills taken within 72 hours of unprotected intercourse.

 

While there have been some limited tests of RU486 as a morning after pill, with mixed results, (10) the only purpose for which the U.S. sponsor has sought government approval is for use to abort a confirmed pregnancy weeks after the baby has already attached himself or herself to the uterine wall.

 

What is the baby like at this time?

During the time frame that RU486 is operative, the baby is undergoing a rapid period of development.

 

It is at about the fifth week of pregnancy (measured from a woman's last menstrual period) that a mother first begins to suspect she is pregnant, so this is likely to be about the earliest that the chemical abortifacient is used. At this point, the child is about three weeks old and approximately 2mm long (about 1/10 of an inch). Even by this time, however, the baby's nervous system has begun to form and his or her heart is likely to have already begun its first beats. The child's heart will be beating strongly and steadily by the time he or she is just three and a half weeks old.

 

The effectiveness of the RU486, or mifepristone, method begins to decline after 49 days, or 7 weeks of pregnancy.  By that time, the baby will be five weeks old and will have increased in size to 8mm, and his or her face, arms, and legs will be distinguishable.

 

Before the end of the 9th week of pregnancy (7 weeks for the baby), the outer extreme of mifepristone's effectiveness,  the child's ears, fingers and toes will have formed and he or she will be 18mm, or nearly an inch tall, from crown to rump.

 

Does RU486 have any other, non-abortifacient, uses?

 While researchers have proposed a long list of diseases and conditions that RU486 might be useful against, and in some cases, conducted limited testing, the only purpose for which the U.S. sponsor has pursued government approval is abortion.

 

Because of its properties as a antiprogestin (a compound that inhibits the action of the hormone progesterone), some believe that it may be helpful in treating endometriosis, fibroids, breast cancer, and certain non-malignant brain tumors called meningomas.  Pro-life groups such as the National Right to Life Committee have never opposed the testing or use of RU486 for such therapeutic purposes, but evidence of its effectiveness in these applications,  as well as evidence of the pill's promoter's real interest in such applications, is limited.

 

Why does a typical RU486 abortion involve a second drug, misoprostol?

Acting alone, RU486 is able to induce an abortion only between 64% and 85% of the time, a rate abortifacient researchers consider "inadequate for general clinical use."  This is why, two days after taking the RU486, a woman is given a prostaglandin, usually misoprostol (trade name: Cytotec), to induce powerful uterine contractions to expel the shriveled corpse.  Because the use of a prostaglandin (PG) is part of the standard RU486 abortion protocol, it is perhaps more accurate to refer to this as an "RU486/PG" abortion.

 

How long does a typical RU486/PG abortion take and how many steps does it involve?

An RU486/PG induced abortion can take days, weeks, or never happen at all. It typically involves three (or more) visits to the doctor's office over a two week period.

 

In her first visit, a woman is "counseled," given a physical examination, perhaps an ultrasound, and if there are no obvious contraindications (common red flags such as high blood pressure, diabetes, heavy smoking, allergies, etc. that could make taking the drug deadly or dangerous for her), she is given the RU486 pills, which she takes in the presence of the abortionist.

 

Two days later, during a second visit to the doctor's office, she is given the prostaglandin, which she takes orally or has inserted vaginally. Gradually, as the drug begins to take effect, she experiences powerful, painful uterine contractions which begin to work to expel the baby.

 

In U.S. trials, about half (49%) aborted during the four hours they spent waiting in the doctor's office following the administration of the prostaglandin. An additional 26 % aborted sometime over the next 20 hours, on the bus ride home, at work, in the shower, etc. The rest who aborted did so at some point during the following two weeks. Between 8% and 23% (depending on how many weeks pregnant the mother was) never completely aborted or didn't abort at all using the drugs.

 

A third visit some 14 days from the woman's initial visit allows the doctor to confirm whether or not the abortion has been completed. If it hasn't, the abortionist will encourage the woman to undergo a surgical abortion to guard against the possibility that she will give birth to a child who may have been injured by the drugs.

 

What sort of medical conditions might keep a woman from being offered the chemical abortion method?

Despite public claims of its ease and safety, the RU486/PG abortion method comes with a long list of contraindications, i.e., conditions that doctors believe should disqualify a woman from using the method or should at least call for heightened caution and monitoring among those selecting patients and administering the drugs because of the increased medical risks faced by such women.

 

Abortion researchers have recommended that women with adrenal failure, severe asthma, or receiving long-term glucocorticoid therapy not be given the drugs. Those same researchers recommend that the drugs be used cautiously in women with complicated diabetes mellitus, severe anemia, hemorrhagic [bleeding or clotting] disorders, or receiving treatment with anticoagulants. A prostaglandin sometimes used with RU486, sulprostone, has been associated with heart failure in women who were over 35, obese, smoked, or had other cardiovascular risk factors, though these have not yet been reported with the prostaglandin misoprostol. (32)

 

Other conditions that previous researchers have considered sufficient grounds to exclude women from clinical trials of the drugs include high blood pressure, bronchitis, menstrual irregularity, fibroids, endometriosis, use of IUD or oral contraceptives (in past three months), history of problem pregnancy, current ectopic pregnancy, pelvic inflammatory disease, allergies, epilepsy, adrenal insufficiency, recent intake of steroid or anti-inflammatory medication, or a history of liver, stomach, or intestinal disease.

 

The FDA declared RU486 "safe" and "effective." Is it really?

It certainly isn't safe for the baby who suffocates or starves to death. And it strains credulity to label a drug that puts perfectly healthy women in the hospital and may not work nearly a quarter of the time"safe" or "effective."

 

Despite careful screening to eliminate all but the most physically ideal candidates, 2% of those participating in U.S. trials of RU486 hemorrhaged.One out of a 100 had to be hospitalized. Several women required surgery to stop the bleeding and some bled so much that they had to have transfusions. In the broader, less regulated medical marketplace, outside the careful monitoring of a clinical trial, complications could be expected to be both more common and more serious, especially for those women who do not have immediate access to emergency care.

 

While tests in France yielded a 95-96% "success" rate,  the success rate in American trials for the two drug procedure has been considerably lower. Women in their fifth week of pregnancy aborted 92% of the time, while women in their seventh week aborted 77% of the time.Outside the strict conditions of a clinical trial, reduced screening, monitoring, and compliance is likely to increase the "failure" rate.

 

Claims of higher effectiveness and less frequent complications made since approval  have yet to be independently medically verified, though a higher incidence of pelvic infections has been reported.

 

Didn't an Iowa woman participating in the U.S. trials in 1994 nearly bleed to death?

Yes. According to Mark Louviere, the doctor who treated the woman, she lost between one-half to two thirds of her total blood volume and probably would have died if she had not had emergency surgery. The doctor came forward after reading a press report that the Iowa portion of the trials had ended with "no complications"among the 238 women there who took part in the test.  "If near death due to the loss of half of one's blood volume, surgery, and a transfusion of four units of blood do not qualify as a complication," Louviere told the Waterloo Courier, "I don't know what does."

 

What other physical side effects are common?

Nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, and painful cramping are quite often part of the package, and sometimes in clinical trials were themselves severe enough to put women in the hospital.  Less frequent, but potentially more serious, are side effects such as infection  or heart palpitations.

 

Are there any long term physical consequences?

This is simply unknown at this point. It is known that RU486 crosses the blood follicle barrier and gets into the follicular fluid surrounding a woman's ripening eggs. What impact this will have on future pregnancies, or on children born later on, has not yet been adequately researched.

 

Are chemical abortions safer than surgical abortions?

Both chemical and surgical abortions have their risks, and it is not clear that they are directly comparable.

 

Promoters of the abortion pill often speak as if RU486/PG abortions are safer because they are earlier abortions.  While it is true that earlier surgical abortions are safer than later surgical abortions, (53) owing to the increasing size of the baby and the increasing complexity of the surgical procedure,  it isn't clear that early chemical abortions are necessarily safer than later surgical abortions. Because the methods are so different, this is like comparing apples and oranges.

 

With surgical abortions, a woman faces the risks of cervical lacerations, uterine or bowel perforations,  scarring, infection, and even permanent infertility.  These risks, due to the surgical process itself, may be avoided in a chemical abortion (provided a woman is not in that 8%-23% for whom the method fails (58)). But the woman undergoing a chemical abortion faces a whole new set of risks, ranging from hemorrhage to heart failure, typically not faced by the surgical patient.

 

Variations in the severity and frequency of these complications make it difficult to identify one method as safer than another. Significant injury or worse is possible with either method.

 

What about psychological after effects?

Though no long term studies have yet been done, the descriptions women give of their encounters with their aborted children raise great concern. Women who have undergone RU486/PG abortions talk about seeing tiny fists, eyes, or seeing their aborted babies laying in the toilet bowl or swirling in the shower drain. () Counselors at abortion clinics indicate it is common for women to express a desire to bury the baby, to perform some sort of ceremony to deal with their strong feelings. () These are hardly the reactions of women who consider this a blob of tissue.

 

Whereas those who undergo surgical abortion only imagine what their unborn children look like and go through, women who have abortions with RU486 have vivid memories of their encounters with their children. And while giving the woman more control over her abortion may assuage the abortionist's guilt, it definitely increases a woman's sense of responsibility for the abortion.

 

While a sense of relief is what many woman having surgical or chemical abortions feel immediately after the abortion, we know from experience that the symptoms of post abortion trauma often do not show up until years later. When women who have had RU486 abortions begin to deal with their experience, they will have more vivid memories and a greater sense of responsibility to deal with than those who underwent surgical abortions.

 

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